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Archive for February, 2010

Haiku!

Thanks for tuning in so regularly on the Farms and Gardens Blog. We just want you to be aware of a small programming note for next week. Starting Monday and going all the way through Friday, we will be communicating stricly in Haiku form. Here’s a little refresher on Haiku, in case it’s been awhile. So when you tune in Monday, that’s what’ll be happening. Until then

Hope your weekend rocks

as you rest up and have fun

don’t forget hunger

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That’s right, we’re not at all afraid to bust out a Ripe Rutabaga Recipe on you. It comes from our favorite Director of Programs, Tonya Post. Tonya works as well in the kitchen as she does with grant reports, so you can trust that this rutabga recipe will reign resplendently in your repertoire of root vegetable repasts.

Rutabaga Casserole

Cook Time: 1 hour

Ingredients:

  • 1 large rutabaga, peeled and cubed
  • 4 medium carrots, shredded
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • dash pepper
  • 1 cup fat free evaporated milk
  • 1 cup cooked brown rice

Preparation:

Cook rutabaga, covered, in boiling salted water until tender, about 25 minutes. Drain well. Cook carrots in boiling salted water for about 5 minute, until just tender.

Transfer cooked rutabaga to a mixing bowl. With an electric hand-held mixer, beat rutabaga with butter, egg, brown sugar, salt, and pepper until smooth and fluffy. Stir in milk; stir in rice and carrots. Spoon into a buttered 10×6 or 8-inch square baking dish. Bake at 350° for 35 to 40 minutes.
Serves 10 to 12.

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A quick garden update from Steven Horton.

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 Inter-Faith Food Shuttle Farm and Garden

                    Crew-Call

 

 

 

 

The weather has slowed down growth at the farm and in the gardens but we’re still hard at work, particularly as we continue to recruit and engage community members and plan new gardens.  We have regular garden days and a community outreach event planed for this week. If you are interested in community engagement this is the week for you!   Please see below for more information.

 

VOLUNTEER TIME & EVENTS:

 

  • Community Garden Work times
    • Neighbor to Neighbor      Thursdays        3:30-5:00pm
    • Mayview         Fridays         3:30-5:00pm 
    • In both gardens we will be working with community members and youth to prep new beds for spring planting and get rid of all the water!  We have limited room for volunteers – please email Amanda (NutritionCoord@foodshuttle.org) if you are planning on coming

 

  • Saturday, Feb 20th from 9:30am-12pm at Alliance Medical Ministries in Raleigh.  We are working with Alliance Medical Ministries and the Raleigh Community Gardens MeetUp group to potentially develop a new garden.  Our first step is to find out if the community is interested and willing to get involved.  This Saturday we will be going door to door to conduct a survey with the community about their gardening interests. If you are planning on coming please email Steve (steven.p.horton@gmail.com) for directions and more details.   

 

**WINTER WEATHER PLAN**

Please note that with the winter weather we might have to cancel crew calls and volunteer times at the last minute.  Often the ground is too wet or frozen from previous weather, even if it is nice outside at the time of the crew call.  If you are interested in coming to an event and note bad weather please call the Food Shuttle (919.250.0043) an hour before the scheduled time to confirm that we are still going out if you have not heard from us at that point. 

LOCAVORE LUNCH – Every Wednesday!

Every Wednesday at noon we are holding local agricultural discussion groups at Farmhouse Pizza, 3011 Hillsborough St. in Raleigh. We will be serving a pizza made using some (hopefully soon to be all) local ingredients from NCSU’s Farmers’ Market. Please RSVP to Steve (steven.p.horton@gmail.com) so he knows many pizzas to have made.  If you can contribute, he is asking for a $5 donation… if you can’t afford the cost we’ll gladly cover you in return for good conversation!   A portion of the proceeds will go to the Inter-Faith Food Shuttle.  This week’s topic will be food labeling.  Organic, natural, naturally grown, local, chemical free, fair trade, free range, pasture raised. What do they all mean!?! 

FARMS & GARDEN BLOG

Keep up with what’s going on with our Farms & Gardens and PAR programs through the IFFS blog farmsandgardens.wordpress.com.  Use the blog to check out weekly ripe recipes, find yourself in photos of weekly crew calls, hear from other volunteers, and stay up to date with activities at IFFS.  Let us know if you’re interested in contributing to the blog!

 

GARDEN SUPPLIES:

We are still in need of hand-tool donations.  We gladly accept new and/or lightly used equipment. Thanks to all who have responded. 

New Volunteer?

If you have not filled out a volunteer form or have a friend who is interested in helping out please email Janet at RGSJRS@aol.com.  

Hope to see you all out there!

Katherine, Sun, Amanda, & Steve

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Inter-Faith Food Shuttle Farm and Garden

                    Crew-Call

 

 

 It’s been a rainy month but we’re still hard at work and trying to keep up with the soggy ground.  Bring your valentine and join us for Friday and Saturday work days – what better way is there to celebrate than getting your hands dirty together?!   Please see below for more information.

 VOLUNTEER TIME & EVENTS: 

  • Friday, Feb 12th from 3:30-5:00pm at the Mayview garden.  We will be recruiting community members to come out and then prepping new beds for spring planting.  We’d love to have you but if you are planning to come please email Amanda (NutritionCoord@foodshuttle.org) so she can let you know if the ground is still too wet to work.  
  • Saturday, Feb 13th from 9am-12pm out at the Farm.  If you are planning on coming please email Sun (Farm@foodshuttle.org) so that he can let you know if the work day gets cancelled for any reason. 

 

FARMS & GARDEN BLOG

Keep up with what’s going on with our Farms & Gardens and PAR programs through the IFFS blog farmsandgardens.wordpress.com.  This week Sun has posted a great description of his childhood and the life events that prepared him to become the incredible farm master and local food activist that he is today.  Use this blog to check out weekly ripe recipes, find yourself in photos of weekly crew calls, hear from other volunteers, and stay up to date with activities at IFFS.  Let us know if you’re interested in contributing to the blog!

LOCAVORE LUNCH – Every Wednesday!

Every Wednesday at noon we are holding local agricultural discussion groups at Farmhouse Pizza, 3011 Hillsborough St. in Raleigh. We will be serving a pizza made using some (hopefully soon to be all) local ingredients from NCSU’s Farmers’ Market. Please RSVP to Steve (steven.p.horton@gmail.com) so he knows many pizzas to have made.  If you can contribute, he is asking for a $5 donation… if you can’t afford the cost we’ll gladly cover you in return for good conversation!   A portion of the proceeds will go to the Inter-Faith Food Shuttle.  This week’s topic will be pesticides, herbicides, insecticides, etc.  We’ll talk about the pros the cons and the risks involved.

GARDEN SUPPLIES:

We are still in need of hand-tool donations.  We gladly accept new and/or lightly used equipment. Thanks to all who have responded. 

New Volunteer?

If you have not filled out a volunteer form or have a friend who is interested in helping out please email Janet at RGSJRS@aol.com.  

Hope to see you all out there!

Katherine, Sun, & Amanda

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Through The Garden

photo by Mark Petko

 By: Sun Butler

In 1972, my Mom quit her modeling job in NYC to start the first natural foods cooperative in Westchester County – in our living room. Furniture, TV and her prized stereo were replaced with bins filled with whole wheat flower, granola and brown rice. She stocked our refrigerator with tofu, kefir and local farmers cheese. We often arrived home to a packed house for coop meetings. If customers arrived at dinner time they were invited to sample her latest health food creations and to trade recipes for delicacies like mung bean soup and tofu lasagna. For the three of us, brought up on a traditional southern meat and greens diet it was quite a shock. But the real shock came 6 months later when my step-father lost his job and our struggling family was left practically income-less.

One day my Mom sat us all down and laid it out for us. There was no money for camp, scouts, dance or judo lessons. In fact there was precious little money just to pay rent and buy groceries. If we were going to “get-by”, we would have to grow a garden. That would be our summer project.

Born on the tail end of the Great Depression, Mom learned the art of “getting-by” with less on her grandmother’s farm , where her large extended family gathered to grow cotton and vegetables and wait out the bad times. Her Cherokee aunts taught her to make fertilizer with vegetable scraps, straw and fish heads from the local groceries and fish markets. We planted the entire back-yard with spinach, lettuce, tomatoes and the classic Native American ‘Three Sisters’ garden of corn, beans and squash. My nickname that summer was Jethro since much of the heavy lifting fell on my 14 year-old shoulders.

We hand dug, weeded, mulched and picked bugs in that garden without chemical fertilizer or pesticides at a time when organic farming was only mentioned in a few obscure books. The rewards were stupendous. Our back-yard became a garden of eating. We kids were delighted that really fresh vegetables tasted so much better than what we were used to from the grocery store. When the garden chores were over we went swimming, picked berries and netted shad out of the river. I found an old pressure canner at a yard sale and we learned to can what we grew.

A year later my grandparents arranged for my sisters to attend Rabun Gap Nacoochee School in north Georgia where they were privileged to work on the Foxfire books and magazine. I became my grandfather’s right hand man in his declining years, helping to look after the farm until I finished college. Lynn and Juel came home on vacations to help Grama can and freeze the pick-up truck loads of corn, beans, tomatoes, apples and black berries that Grapa and I brought in from the farm. And we all learned to sucker and barn tobacco. I remember at the time feeling like the poor country cousin to my friends in New York when we came home for visits. It was worse for my sisters who toiled away at the cannery in Chase City while their drama queen girlfriends participated in summer stock in NY.

For all of our complaining though, we acquired a fearless-ness and sense of self-sufficiency that has stead us well through the ups and downs of our adult lives. As Grama often said, “we have lived high on the hog and low on the totem pole, but we always had something good to eat.” It is my goal here at Inter-Faith Food Shuttle’s Farm & Community Garden program to pass some of that certainty on to every volunteer and participant in our programs. We will see ya’ll at the Farm this Spring.

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Yes, that’s right! After a month’s hiatus, we are back to bringing you tasty recipes with ingredients you can use from your garden or fresh local food from a farmer’s market in town. This recipe is from Sally, our Director of Administration. Enjoy!

Roasted spiced butternut squash

Ingredients

  • 1 butternut squash 2 ¼ lb, halved, seeded, peeled, cut into ¾ inch cubes
  • 3 T butter
  • ¼ cup sugar (I used less and added a squirt of maple syrup.)
  • 1 t ground cinnamon
  • ½ t salt
  • ¼ tsp ground black pepper
  • 1/8 t ground cloves
  • fresh finely chopped ginger
  • walnuts

Directions

Preheat oven to 375 F.  Place squash in a baking dish.  Drizzle with butter, toss to coat.  Blend sugar, spices and mix into squash.  Bake until squash is tender and syrup bubbles thickly in dish, stirring every 15 minutes, about 50 minutes total.

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